A clockwork orange cliff notes

A clockwork orange cliff notes

It should also be noted that after the government uses Ludvico’s Technique (LT) on Alex, along with eliminating his ability to act cruelly, it also caused him to lose his love of music, arguably, his only redeeming trait. Afterall, the goal, as Dr. Brodsky said was focused, “only [on] cutting down crime” (141). LT makes no distinction between Alex’s love for classical music and his love of committing violence; and therefore, when the technique is performed on Alex, he loses his ability to enjoy music as well as his free will. Something that causes humans to be unique is that, buy essay online as Walt Whitman said, we contain multitudes, but what happens when layers of the human are peeled away? Dr. Brodsky calls this, the punishment aspect. “Here’s the punishment aspect, perhaps. The governor ought to be pleased” (128). Another doctor, Dr. Branom, who helps perform the experiment on Alex, shows how humans have not been able to understand the natural human so far; therefore, we should not start to modify what we do not understand. He says, “The processes of life, the make-up of the human organism, who can fully understand these miracles?” (121). A clockwork orange cliff notes

An Analysis of A Clockwork Orange

Alex is a fifteen year old Nadsat (teenager), criminal, and Friend and Humble Narrator in Antony Burgess’s A Clockwork Orange — a novel that explores a world of teenage sadists in dystopian England. Throughout A Clockwork Orange (ACO), Burgess proves that humans must choose goodness for the act to be truly righteous. “Does God want goodness or the choice of goodness? Is a man who chooses the bad perhaps in some way better than a man who has the good imposed upon him?” (106).

In ACO, Burgess argues that once a person loses their free will, they are no longer human — a Clockwork Orange, so to speak — something as mechanical as the processes of harvesting fruit: the plant, the growth, the wilting, the death.

Throughout ACO, the same phrase keeps appearing: “What’s it going to be then, eh?” (Parts 1, 2, and 3). It is the same phrase that the novel starts and ends with. Burgess keeps allowing Alex a choice, and by allowing him the choice, he shows how Alex eventually chooses good on his own in the final chapter. Alex says on the last page, “But now as I end this story, brothers, I am not young, not no longer, oh no. Alex like groweth up, oh yes” (212). The final chapter represents how every person should have the right to correct their wrongs and will eventually choose goodness if they are given the chance, just as Alex and his former gang members did.

Georgie and Alex, the ones who were given the smallest number of choices, were also the two of the gang who stayed violent for the longest and suffered the most. Because Alex was excluded from making choices both in prison and in the real world after he was released, he saw no point in living because he could make no real choice. He would rather be voluntarily dead than forcibly alive.

Burgess also shows how the experiments performed upon Alex in no way changed him and that oppression can cause people to take depreserate measures such as Alex’s attempted sucide as a result of his inability to feed his unsatisfied bloodlust. Before the government gave him the medicine to reverse the effects of aversion therapy however, he still had no sense of what was right wrong. When finds refuge with F. Alexander whose wife had died from shock after being brutally raped by Alex’s gang, Alex goes to sleep, only to wake the next morning to say, “I had a real horrorshow night’s sleep, brothers” (177). Therefore, Alex was not even changed by the experiment.

It should also be noted that after the government uses Ludvico’s Technique (LT) on Alex, along with eliminating his ability to act cruelly, it also caused him to lose his love of music, arguably, his only redeeming trait. Afterall, the goal, as Dr. Brodsky said was focused, “only [on] cutting down crime” (141). LT makes no distinction between Alex’s love for classical music and his love of committing violence; and therefore, when the technique is performed on Alex, he loses his ability to enjoy music as well as his free will. Something that causes humans to be unique is that, as Walt Whitman said, we contain multitudes, but what happens when layers of the human are peeled away? Dr. Brodsky calls this, the punishment aspect. “Here’s the punishment aspect, perhaps. The governor ought to be pleased” (128). Another doctor, Dr. Branom, who helps perform the experiment on Alex, shows how humans have not been able to understand the natural human so far; therefore, we should not start to modify what we do not understand. He says, “The processes of life, the make-up of the human organism, who can fully understand these miracles?” (121).

Anthony Burgess accomplishes two goals in his novel: First, he shows the reader how having choice is more important than taking action. Second, he counters this and explains how every argument made in ACO is a testament to how easily a reader can be fooled — how humans become the Clockwork Oranges that the novel argues against. Sympathizing with Alex in the novel is easy, and Burgess predicted that his readers would. Whether this sympathy comes from a reader’s own memories of youth, the consequence Alex faces, or misplaced trust in potential “goodness” in the main character (or humanity), the bottom line is that Alex kills; Alex damages. He steals; he rapes. Alex had already lost control over his actions when the reader first met him — before Ludvico’s Technique was performed upon him. He was inhuman. He was godless. And he was most certainly more dead than alive. It is just as Dr. Brodsky said, “You made your choice, and all this is a consequence of your choice” (141). For any person who commits such heinous acts as Alex can not have any humanity remaining within them to alter. People have rights. The deal is that they retain those rights as long as they don’t take away another’s.

A Clockwork Orange does not exist to tell us that Alex is a victim. Through slang, a godless figure, and atrocities, the novel lives to show how humans are susceptible to believing words when they sound poetic and allow men excuses to act upon their darkest desires.

A clockwork orange cliff notes

A clockwork orange cliff notes

Georgie and Alex, the ones who were given the smallest number of choices, were also the two of the gang who stayed violent for the longest and suffered the most. Because Alex was excluded from making choices both in prison and in the real world after he was released, he saw no point in living because he could make no real choice. He would rather be voluntarily dead than forcibly alive. buy essay A clockwork orange cliff notes

— You Won’t Expect the Ending By Julia Rose Harmon —
A clockwork orange cliff notes
Anthony Burgess accomplishes two goals in his novel: First, he shows the reader how having choice is more important than taking action. Second, he counters this and explains how every argument made in ACO is a testament to how easily a reader can be fooled — how humans become the Clockwork Oranges that the novel argues against. Sympathizing with Alex in the novel is easy, and Burgess predicted that his readers would. Whether this sympathy comes from a reader’s own memories of youth, the consequence Alex faces, or misplaced trust in potential “goodness” in the main character (or humanity), the bottom line is that Alex kills; Alex damages. He steals; he rapes. Alex had already lost control over his actions when the reader first met him — before Ludvico’s Technique was performed upon him. He was inhuman. He was godless. And he was most certainly more dead than alive. It is just as Dr. Brodsky said, “You made your choice, and all this is a consequence of your choice” (141). For any person who commits such heinous acts as Alex can not have any humanity remaining within them to alter. People have rights. The deal is that they retain those rights as long as they don’t take away another’s. A clockwork orange cliff notes Branom, who helps perform the experiment on Alex, shows how humans have not been able to understand the natural human so far; therefore, we should not start to modify what we do not understand. A clockwork orange cliff notes
A clockwork orange cliff notes Throughout ACO, the same phrase keeps appearing: “What’s it going to be then, eh?” (Parts 1, 2, and 3). It is the same phrase that the novel starts and ends with. Burgess keeps allowing Alex a choice, and by allowing him the choice, he shows how Alex eventually chooses good on his own in the final chapter. Alex says on the last page, “But now as I end this story, brothers, I am not young, not no longer, oh no. Alex like groweth up, oh yes” (212). The final chapter represents how every person should have the right to correct their wrongs and will eventually choose goodness if they are given the chance, just as Alex and his former gang members did.